My Teaching Philosophy

I have drawn and painted my whole life. Art has always been a way to connect to the world for me, a way to tell stories, and a way to discover myself. 

I could not read until I was eight due to dyslexia, and I always found art as a powerful tool to express myself. I believe that art has the power to unlock the full potential of students, and to help them engage with the world. Over the years, I have taught art to a variety of groups, and have always found that art was a way to engage students, and to provide a means of understanding the world, when other methods and approaches may have been less successful.

I grew up in challenging circumstances, and found that art was a way that I could make sense of the world, and a way through which I could find meaning. My experiences in life have shaped me to be empathetic, and I have found that art can be a powerful way to bring people back into society, and to have a vested interest and engagement with society. When I taught art to gang members in the 1990s, I found art to be a transformative tool, and a way of reaching youth and  tapping into their great potential. 

In my old art, I have expressed Cree stories and collective experiences. I have also used my art to show the power of healing and transformation. (See some of my work here).

I believe that art can be made from materials all around us, including material that would otherwise be thrown away or recycled. Art can help students to not only understand themselves and their society, but also to be empathetic to our planet. 

As a teacher, I believe it is my job to teach students basic technical skills. Another key aspect of being a teacher is be a guide, and help foster the creative potential of all students.